The Movie List

This is just a list of the movies I have seen since I started keeping this list. It’s more for my benefit to help me remember than anything else. After all, I’m an old fart, and I hate renting movies that I have forgotten I have already seen. You’ve done that, too, haven’t you? The comments were written after watching the movie, but don’t ask me to tell you more because I usually forget what the stupid movie was about, unless it was something that struck my fancy.

October, 2010 – I’ve signed up with Netflix now, so I’m sure I’ll be watching more movies than in the past. Compared to the prices that I used to pay to rent a film from the video store, Netflix is a steal. This could be interesting.

November, 2016 – I’ve pretty much given up on writing the capsule summaries of the movies I have watched. Heck, I haven’t even been listing the movies. I’ve watched so many that it seems more trouble than it’s worth to list them. For now, this page isn’t really being updated, but maybe I will make further entries if the movie is particularly interesting or if I get a bug up my butt about updating the list.

The Movies –

  • 9 Songs  – a story about the relationship between a guy and a girl, weakly tied together by nine rock concert songs – the minimal background story is useless – if you like graphic sex, this will work for you – as weak as it was, it made me wish I were young again.
  • 18 Again – run of the mill, 80’s style, formula flick wherein grandson and grandfather swap bodies – my hopes with George Burns in it were dashed
  • 88 Minutes – an acceptable mystery/psychological thriller, but not worth owning – on the other hand, I’m happy to watch Alicia Witt in just about anything, but that’s just the hopeless, dirty old man in me
  • Absinthe – very interesting documentary about the history of absinthe
  • After Porn Ends – documentary about lives of porn actors/actresses, mostly after leaving the industry – some interesting insights and some less than happy.
  • Agatha Christie’s Evil Under the Sun – Enjoyable mystery with Hercule Poirot, though I prefer David Suchet over Peter Ustinov
  • Agatha Christie’s Poirot – the series shown on public television stations in the U.S. – very enjoyable – watched all the episodes there were and wish there were more
  • Agatha Christie’s Seven Dials Mystery – not as good as I hoped it would be and seemed to go on forever
  • Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams – a series of eight stories based on Kurosawa’s dreams – some more interesting than others – Japanese with subtitles.
  • Alice – Woody Allen’s use of magical realism as the means to self-understanding, best line in the movie – “I am going to be going on a diet.”
  • Alice in Wonderland – the new version – the CG is the most interesting thing in the whole movie
  • Amanda – I think the title to this movie about a man whose wife claims to have been born a man is tongue-in-cheeck – A Man, Duh! – the movie kind of wimps out in the end
  • Amélie – a charming, sweet French movie – and one I would watch again
  • American Friends – a serious Michael Palin vehicle, written and acted by him and based on his family history – an Oxford don gives up his career for love
  • American Pie – sophomoric, but entertaining
  • American Pie 2 – more of the same, and still entertaining
  • Angels & Demons – suspend your belief for a while and you can enjoy this action flick – I do wonder, though, how much in the film is accurate as it relates to the Catholic church – a follow-up to The DaVinci Code but only peripherally
  • Another Woman – directed by Woody Allen – one of his serious movies – this is an interesting view into the psychology of more than just the main character
  • Atlas Shrugged – Part 1 – I wanted to like this movie, because I love the book, but I’m afraid it sucked – almost of necessity because there is so much to the book that it would be almost impossible to develop it all in a short movie, even if you do it in three parts – this would be best produced as an extensive mini-series on television.
  • Atlas Shrugged – Part 2 – well, it was better than part 1, but I admit I left the theater saying “I could have done better myself” – it was only after the movie that I found out that the entire thing had been recast from part 1 – guess the actors weren’t too memorable – let’s hope the final part (if they make it) redeems parts 1 & 2 – why do I doubt it?
  • Avatar – an obvious “morality play” using the usual big, bad business in conflict with the innocent, nature-loving natives – really nothing new here except the great computer graphics and, of course, bodies that most of us would die for – guess there are no fat Na’vi
  • Ayn Rand: In Her Own Words – an excellent documentary about Ayn Rand, her beliefs, and her career, largely told through interviews with her
  • Barry Munday – not at all what I expected from the movie blurb – an interesting character study – Jean Smart is really nice in this
  • Batman and Robin – why in the world did they bother? . . better still, why did I watch all of it? . . worst Batman movie ever
  • Batman Begins – usual Batman type fare
  • Bedtime Stories – a cute story, worth watching, good family fare
  • Beowulf – done completely in cgi – not bad except the faces of the women characters were particularly, um, characterless.
  • Better Than Chocolate – don’t let the “lesbian” label throw you off – enjoyable and better than a lot of the films I have watched, mostly because it has a sense of humor
  • The Big Lebowski – better than I thought it would be
  • The Big White – a Robin Williams vehicle, and not his best
  • Blythe Spirit – from 1945, not great, but Margaret Rutherford steals the show
  • The Black Dahlia – a mystery not worth solving . . . snore
  • Bolt – enjoyable kid’s movie about a movie star dog who discovers his “in movie” abilities are not real – seems to me a lot of human actors could take this lesson
  • Blue Butterfly – a bit sappy, but kind of an uplifting move anyways
  • Boynton Beach Club – enjoyable, and something to which we on the older end of the stick can relate
  • Borat – yeah, I watched it, what can I say?
  • The Break-Up – yes, I love Jennifer Aniston and if Vince Vaughn doesn’t want her, I’ll take her
  • Bridge to Terebithia – not at all what I was expecting but not in a bad way, occasionally thought provoking and a bit of a tear-jerker
  • Bridget Jones’s Diary – a decent, light, romantic comedy – nothing particularly original, but worth watching
  • Broadway Danny Rose – catching up on Woody Allen movies I have missed – almost didn’t recognize Mia Farrow in this one – not as introspective as a lot of Woody’s movies, but entertaining
  • Broken Flowers – I like Bill Murray, and this film has it’s moments, but in the end . . . eh . . .
  • The Brothers Grimm – good enough for an evening’s entertainment
  • The Brown Bunny – takes a long, boring time getting to the slight twist at the end – I suggest you don’t bother.
  • The Bucket List – not a great movie and predictable for much of it, but when you start to get older, movies like this have more meaning for you
  • The Canterville Ghost – remake of the original, this time with Patrick Stewart – pretty good – I like the original, too.
  • Cashback – the time-stopping in this film is really only a plot device that allows for exposition by the main character – enjoyable movie – in some ways I could really relate
  • Casino Royale – Latest 007 movie, at least when I watched it – usual Bond fun
  • Cat Woman – the only reason I watched this was that I couldn’t get to sleep and needed something mindless to watch, and I got what I was looking for. Halle Berry may look good, but the special effects are pretty sucky and the story keeps up with the special effects.
  • Chaos Theory – a story on how the best laid plans can go astray and change your life – very enjoyable
  • Christmas with the Kranks – another move good enough for an evening’s entertainment
  • Christmas Vacation (National Lampoon’s) – must watch movie for every Christmas season – I think this is my favorite Chevy Chase movie.
  • The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe – good special effects, interesting concepts from the C.S. Lewis book
  • The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian – not at all as good as The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe – pretty much just an action battle from beginning to end without much depth
  • The Circus Clown – going back to 1934, I was surprised to learn that Joe E. Brown was actually a former circus performer
  • Cleopatra – sometimes it takes me a long time to see a movie – I remember looking at (what seemed at the time to be) risqué shots from the film when I was a kid – ah, the days of spectacle movie making
  • Clerks – cult classic from Kevin Smith about clerks in a store – not for everyone
  • Clerks II – the follow up of Clerks
  • Cloud 9 (Wolke Neun) – a German movie about a woman who falls in love with another man when she is in her 60’s – I thought this was very, very good – if you are offended by rather graphic sex by old people, don’t watch.
  • Clue – a fun little movie based on the game, with lots of name actors
  • Cold Comfort Farm – not the most riveting of tales, but entertaining – story of a recently orphaned girl (actually a young woman) who goes to live with relatives on a farm and winds up changing all their lives through her machinations
  • Cold Sweat – a little T&A helps this pic – started watching to check it out and watched to the end – it was half-way decent, if you disregard most of the acting, specially Dave Thomas’.
  • Corpse Bride – animated entertainment, good for one watch
  • Crimes and Misdemeanors – typical Woody Allen fare – exploration of morality, love, sex, etc. – a bit of a precursor to Match Point
  • The Curious Case of Benjamin Button – Not nearly as good as I expected it to be – was at least pretty good up until the end, which I think was not done right, but who am I?
  • Dagmar’s Hot Pants – still catching up on my 70’s Swedish skin flicks – nothing great, but now I can say I’ve seen it, though having seen it, I can say I need not have bothered
  • The Darjeeling Limited – odd and quirky – I enjoyed watching it once, but feel no need to own it – scenery and setting was interesting
  • The Dark Knight – no doubt in my mind, Heath Ledger made this movie and it’s worth watching just for him
  • The Darwin Awards – a cop who can’t stand the sight of blood turns to investigating people who might/do kill themselves by their own stupidity – pretty good movie
  • Date Night – good for a little entertainment, even if lightweight and predictable
  • The DaVinci Code – good exciting mystery – might even be worth another watch
  • Dead Cert – an older film, a murder mystery with the theme of British horse racing – interesting to see earlier Judy Dench acting
  • Death at a Funeral – This is the 2007 production directed by Frank Oz, which is an enjoyable farce of a funeral, British accents and all. Actually watched this twice, although by accident, and enjoyed it both times
  • Deconstructing Harry – Woody Allen plays author Harry Block, whose life is “deconstructed” in the course of the film – directed by Allen, too – typically semi-autobiographical
  • Death at a Funeral – 2010 American remake with Chris Rock and Martin Lawrence – sorry, the original was better
  • Deuce Bigelow – European Gigalo – Rob Schneider will do anything for a laugh, and does – appeals to the poo-poo joke part of my psyche and not much else
  • Doc Martin – I was really enjoying this British series about a (shall we say) socially unskilled doctor, when Netflix pulled the later seasons – thanks a lot, jackass
  • Doctor Detroit – 1980’s vehicle for Dan Akroyd – only watch it if you like Dan Akroyd or 1980’s comedies.
  • Dr. Dolittle – Eddie Murphy version – has some fun spots in it and is enjoyable enough for one viewing
  • Enchanted – an enchanting film, perhaps predictable, but enjoyably so – fun play between the world of animation and the “real” world
  • Escanaba in da Moonlight – an odd mix of hunting story and magical realism – acceptable entertainment but not for everyone.
  • Everything Is Illuminated – better than I thought it would be, though a tad strange
  • The Fairy (La Fée) – odd French movie that really caught me up – it could almost have been a silent film – and I am now in love with Fiona Gordon
  • The Family Stone – I don’t wish family gatherings like this on anyone, but watching it wasn’t too bad
  • Fantastic 4 – comic book heroes romp and stomp, not anywhere near as good as X-Men
  • Fathers and Sons – three stories about fathers & sons, okay, but not particularly inspiring
  • Finding Bliss – a young woman uses the porn studio she is working at to make her own “serious” film – this is actually a romantic comedy and not a real skin flick.
  • Flock of Dodos – interesting documentary examining the attempt to legitimize “intelligent design” vs. evolution
  • Four Rooms – four stories by four different directors using a bellhop in a hotel as the main character in all four stories – quirky, with Tim Roth (the bellboy) making the film
  • From Time to Time – set in the 1940’s, a pretty good ghost story involving seeing back in time – good family fare.
  • Genesis – a very short (29 min.) Spanish film about a sculptor – would have made a good R-rated Twilight Zone episode.
  • The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo – the Swedish version – enjoyed it very much – I guess subtitles don’t bother me.
  • Good Will Hunting – a very good personal growth tale
  • Gosford Park – a murder mystery that is more a study of the British social order in the 1930s and more enjoyable as that than as a mystery
  • Grave Indiscretion – this was described as a black comedy, but I didn’t see any humor in it – it was watchable, but nothing I want to watch again – one of Sting’s acting opportunities.
  • The Great New Wonderful – not so great or wonderful, with a wacko psychiatrist
  • Groundhog Day – I have watched this so many times I have lost count – the concept of the movie just resonates with me
  • Grumpier Old Men – Sequel to Grumpy Old Men, more of the same, some touching moments.
  • Grumpy Old Men – took me a long time to finally see this movie – good entertainment, and Ann-Margret doesn’t look bad either.
  • Hannah and Her Sisters – in the top ten and watched several times, there is just so much in this movie to which I can relate
  • Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 – Sometimes I wish that I had not read the book before I saw the movie. I wonder if someone coming fresh to the movie would find it as confusing as I think they would having not read the book. This movie seemed loose and incoherent and the hand-held camera work in several scenes was very distracting. A disappointing movie, but to be honest, the book itself left a lot to be desired.
  • Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix – yes, I’m a Harry Potter fan – read all the books and have enjoyed all the movies – your viewing of this movie will be greatly enhanced by reading the book first.
  • Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince – the movie version of the second-to-last book – well done (more understandable, I think, than the Order of the Phoenix), but once again, read the book!
  • Harvey – the Jimmy Stewart and pooka classic – had never seen the whole thing before – enjoyed it very much, but not sure how much “the younger generation” would.
  • Hellboy II – The Golden Army – great fun, enjoyed the first movie, too – okay, so I have no taste
  • Heroes – no, not really a movie, but I watched the whole first season on DVD so it qualifies in my book – really loved this series
  • The Hobbit – Part 1 – saw this on Christmas Eve – enjoyed it very much and am looking forward to the next two parts – the length might not be as tolerable to a non-Tolkien fan.
  • Hogfather – Based on the Terry Pratchett novel, I enjoyed it more than I thought I would – the dialog at the end brought up a few points that I’m still thinking about
  • Hollywood Ending – I like Woody Allen, even when the movie is so-so
  • Hollywoodland – kind of a mystery movie about George Reeves’ (Superman) death
  • Hope Springs – a predictable romance movie, but it could be worse
  • The Hound of the Baskervilles – yes, Sherlock Holmes, but don’t look for anything serious – this is the 1978 Dudley Moore and Peter Cook version (same duo in the original “Bedazzled” movie)
  • Howl – movie centered around Allen Ginsberg’s poem “Howl” and the obscenity trial against it’s publisher back in 1957 – part poetry reading, part animated poetry video, part courtroom drama and part biography – very interesting
  • Ice Age 2 – animated entertainment was fair to watch
  • Interiors – if you are looking for laughs or witty banter, this drama by Woody Allen is not it, but it is a serious look at dysfunctional individuals in a family
  • The Illusionist – good story, maybe I’m too gullible, but it fooled me
  • I’m a Cyborg, but That’s Ok – a Korean movie about a girl who thinks she’s a robot and is placed in a psych ward – seems to find love in the end, but it’s a quirky movie all around.
  • The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus – a Terry Gilliam story, which should say it all – entertaining and interesting
  • Indiana Jones & The Kingdom of the Crystal Skull – Indi is showing his age, but it’s a watchable movie.
  • Iron Man – an entertaining comic character romp – Robert Downy, Jr. is a good actor in spite of his personal demons.
  • It’s Complicated – an interesting look at relationships – I wasn’t sure how this would turn out. Sometimes life can, indeed, be complicated.
  • Jeff Dunham’s Very Special Christmas Special – if you like ventriloquist Dunham, you’ll like this – it has it’s moments.
  • Julie & Julia – covers the year that Julie cooked through Julia’s cookbook, and Julia Child’s life during the time she wrote the cookbook – enjoyable for people who appreciate the uniqueness of Julia Child.
  • Kevin Smith: Too Fat for 40 – This is pretty much a monologue about things in Kevin Smith’s life – entertaining in typical Kevin Smith style
  • Kill Bill: Volume I – I was surprised that I liked this as much as I did. I am not a Quentin Tarantino fan so was not expecting to.
  • Kill Bill: Volume II – actually, I liked this better than volume I, and I’m still surprised that Quentin Tarantino turned out something I enjoyed watching.
  • King of the Corner – I should be able to relate to a slightly later than mid-life crisis, but this was a bit boring
  • Kingdom – a British drama series about solicitor Peter Kingdom and those surrounding him – stars Stephen Fry – too bad only three short season’s worth because I quite enjoyed it.
  • Kingdom of Heaven – ya gotta love those Crusaders – big scale, good story – not sure about the historical accuracy
  • King of the Corner – I should be able to relate to a slightly later than mid-life crisis, but this was a bit boring
  • Kissed – don’t watch this if the idea of necrophilia creeps you out – this is not a horror film, but a story of one woman’s fascination with the idea, as well as a relationship that comes to an almost inevitable conclusion.
  • Labyrinth – Jim Henson Muppet-like film – interesting casting David Bowie as the bad guy – not the best Henson movie, but ok
  • Lady in the Water – a quirky fantasy story by M. Night Shyamalan – entertaining
  • The Ladykillers – a enjoyable Coen brothers movie – in the end, crime does not pay, at least not for the criminals. The DVD bonus feature about the instrument maker was good, too.
  • The Last Airbender – a hodgepodge of pseudo-eastern philosophy and science fiction – acting really sucked and the ending was left open for future sequels – not recommended.
  • Last Chance Harvey – it’s a little tough to swallow the idea that the age difference between the two romantic leads wouldn’t matter (in real life a difference of 22 years), but Dustin Hoffman is charming and I really like Emma Thompson – good for one watch
  • The Last Good Time – the old fart’s secret desire – to make love to a young woman one last time
  • Last Holiday – cute movie – Queen Latifah is nice in this
  • Leap Year (Año Bisiesto) – this was recommended to me, I don’t know why, perhaps as a joke, as I found nothing redeeming in it – a young woman seeks out anonymous sex, progresses through sadomasochistic sex to what appears to be a death wish, only to narrowly escape it – not recommended at all (this is a Mexican film with subtitles).
  • Legendary Sin Cities: Paris, Berlin and Shanghai – documentary about these cities between WWI and WWII – very interesting, if you like history and aren’t offended by a little skin
  • Let’s Dance – a Fred Astaire and Betty Hutton post-WWII movie with plenty of dancing – a little before my time – I don’t think I’m a Betty Hutton fan.
  • Let’s Talk About Sex – a documentary about how we handle adolescent sex in this country as well as an insight as to how it is handled in the Netherlands – very interesting, even if I have no teen to talk to about this anymore.
  • L’iceberg – I sought out this movie after watching The Fairy – both of these movies are almost ballet – quirky and not for everyone, but I love it
  • The Life Aquatic – huh? forced myself to finish watching this one
  • Lo – not what I expected from the description – it’s handled more like a play – not a horror film, more a very odd romance story, and don’t expect any real action – not for everyone.
  • Love Actually – very enjoyable – a feel-good movie even with a couple of less than happy moments – several concurrent stories that loosely come together at the end
  • The Lovely Bones – not quite what I expected, but I enjoyed it, as much as you can enjoy a movie like this – Saoirse Ronan made me wish I were fifteen again
  • Lord, Save Us From Your Followers – pretty even-handed exploration of how religion is a dividing force in America.
  • The Making of South Park: 6 Days to Air – a documentary on how they put episodes of South Part together on such a tight time frame.
  • The Man Who Knew Too Little – typical Bill Murray fare about a man caught up in a real spy plot while he thinks he is participating in a fantasy theater performance – enjoyable if you like Bill Murray but don’t care for some of his more obscure stuff.
  • Man, Woman and the Wall – I was killing a little time and stumbled across this strong “R”/soft porn movie on Netflix – story about a good pervert and a bad pervert, with the good pervert getting the girl in the end
  • Manhattan – shades of real life to come, Woody Allen’s character is torn between a teenager and a woman his age – entertaining but one of those movies where you would like to slap the main character upside the head
  • Manhattan Murder Mystery – Woody Allen directs and stars – a fun movie that has you siding with Allen’s character and then things change
  • Mapp & Lucia – British sitcom – 1985-1986 – I like Geraldine McEwan so I watched this, but in the end it grew wearisome
  • Match Point – strangest movie I’ve seen directed by Woody Allen, talk about getting away with murder
  • The Men Who Stare at Goats – entertaining, but in the end I could have gone without seeing it
  • Midnight Clear – I had my reservations when I read that this was a “Christian” movie, but it was well done and not too preachy.
  • My Future Boyfriend – mild family fare about a man gone back in time to find out what love is – I have no clue why it should be rated TV-14
  • My Mother’s Smile – perhaps typically Italian in cluture, the story of a son’s disinclination to go along with family members working to have his mother designated as a saint
  • Mr. North – lightweight adaptation of Thornton Wilder’s last novel “Theophilus North” – or, having never read the novel, perhaps a faithful adaptation – a light story in any event
  • Night at the Museum – a fun movie, lightweight but I like Ben Stiller
  • Night at the Museum 2: Battle of the Smithsonian – about the same as the original – fun, fantasy adventure, good for an evening’s entertainment
  • The Nightmare Before Christmas – I guess it was worth filling some idle time, but nothing I found particularly charming or that I would watch again.
  • Northern Exposure – yes, another TV series, but I’ve been going through the seasons on DVD – loved this series when I watched on TV and it’s great to re-live it – later seasons don’t thrill me as much
  • The Notebook – call me a sap, but I liked this one and bought the DVD, too emotionally draining to watch too often
  • The Nude Bomb – even in 1980 this Maxwell Smart movie would have sucked
  • Obselidia – well-acted, thoughtful film – something to keep you moving forward, even if all will end – I could watch this again.
  • Off the Map – bit of an odd movie, IRS agent in the desert with an odd family, but I liked it
  • Pan’s Labyrinth – weird and depressing
  • Painted Skin:The Resurrection – I am surprised at how much I liked this Chinese movie – beautifully filmed and a great story – takes absolutely no backseat to Hollywood
  • Pastorela – sure do love Netflix – I’m willing to take a chance on something like this Mexican movie because it’s streaming and I can just stop watching if I want – however, I did not want to stop watching this irreverent and wacky story about a nativity play – the main character in this movie would scare the shit out of me if I met him in a dark alley, or anyplace else
  • Paul Blart: Mall Cop – formulaic comedy with one or two half-way funny moments. The longer I live, the more I see the same movie over and over and over again
  • The Phantom of the Opera – I’m emotionally invested in this one
  • Piccadilly Jim – based on a P.G. Wodehouse novel – occasionally entertaining, but for the most nothing exceptional – a very “optional” movie
  • The Pink Panther – Steve Martin’s version – no where near as endearing as the original
  • Pirates of the Carribbean – Curse of the Black Pearl – better than I thought it would be, worth another watch
  • Pirates of the Carribbean – Dead Man’s Chest – sequel to the above, again better than expected
  • Popatopolis – this film follows B-movie maker Jim Wynorski as he creates a soft-core film in three days – interesting insights into this side of film making
  • Prime – romantic comedy with Merle Streep as a psychologist, watchable once
  • The Princess Bride – a cultural reference that you would be the poorer for not seeing – a light, romantic, adventure fairy-tale type story.
  • The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes – 1970 Billy Wilder film that I enjoyed – not sure that the streaming version is the same as the DVD, so there may be room for quibbling
  • The Pursuit of Happyness – Will Smith feel-good movie, worth watching
  • Rango – entertaining animated feature with some great voice talent – a good family film
  • Religulous – Bill Maher doing his anti-religion thing – you won’t like it if you are religious.
  • Reggie Perrin – a British tv comedy starring Martin Clunes, which is the only reason I watched it – turns out it was quite enjoyable, and even relatable.
  • Rent – sure wish I could have seen a stage performance, but I love the movie and the soundtrack
  • Rogue One – Holy Cow! It’s almost like it’s 1977 again. Excellent addition to the Star Wars mythos.
  • Rosemary & Thyme – another British mystery series which is entertaining, and Felicity Kendal is a love of mine from way back (think The Good Life back in the mid-70’s)
  • Rubber – a strange movie revolving around a killer tire, and the audience watching the events unfold, and the crew in charge of the whole thing – very offbeat
  • Rumor Has It – kind of a pointless movie, with shades of The Graduate, but with Jennifer Aniston
  • Rushmore – worth watching, but not worth owning – I like Bill Murray but this, in my humble opinion, is not one of his stronger roles – it’s a bit of a strange, um, coming-of-age movie
  • Ruth Rendell Mysteries – the stories may be worth reading (haven’t read them, so don’t know) but I struggled through the first three stories in this British series and it was exactly that – a struggle – and I gave up the struggle after three.
  • RV – why?
  • The Saddest Music in the World – if you like main stream movies and are not into “art” films, pass on this one. I stuck it out and wondered why at the end.
  • Samaritan Girl – after her friend’s death, a girl who tries to undo what she and her friend had been doing, then her father gets involved and there is no happy ending – a Korean movie
  • Season of the Witch – Medieval fighting men winning against the devil and restoring the world to equilibrium – of course, both good guys wind up dead in the end
  • Sherlock Holmes – a new interpretation of Holmes (Robert Downey, in this case) as just as physically capable a detective as intellectually so. Good movie worth one or two viewings.
  • Sherlock Holmes (British Series) – the series of mysteries which star Jeremy Brett as Sherlock Holmes – by far my favorite Holmes
  • The Sorcerer’s Apprentice – not the Disney short, the one with Nicholas Cage – enjoyable entertainment
  • Slaughterhouse-Five – the movie based on Kurt Vonnegut’s book, which I read long ago – the film seems to fit right into the same frame of mind
  • Somethings Gotta Give – an old fart coming around to reality, and liking it
  • Special – almost a black comedy, this is more a study of where psychosis and reality overlap, with a man trying to be more than he is, trying to be “special”
  • Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter . . and Spring – foreign film about a monk and his young charge as he grows up and matures, memorable
  • Stranger Than Fiction – Will Ferrell is getting better, a tale about a man changing his life through the intervention of his inventor
  • Star Wars: The Force Awakens – classic Star Wars fare, the next chapter in the story. Seemed like too much of a repeat of the original, but the feel-good of seeing old friends on screen again was worth it.
  • The Squid and the Whale – lives falling apart, without much plot and hard to watch
  • Stephen Fry in America – Stephen Fry tours the whole of the U.S. in six episodes – handled very well without slamming American idiosyncrasies – relatively lightweight considering the limit of only six episodes.
  • The Stone Angel – this reminded me a lot of “A Trip to Bountiful” except that it was a harsher look at the lives of the people involved – made me kind of depressed thinking about all the mistakes I have made in my life
  • The Story of O – never saw this when it came out in 1975 – decided to catch up – not really worth the time to watch, though – not as risque as it was back then.
  • Storyville: The Naked Dance – good documentary on New Orleans’ legal red light district in the early 1900’s
  • Sunshine Cleaning – a good character study – first movie I have watched that I would never have known about if not for streaming Netflix
  • There’s Something About Mary – screwball, slapstick, romantic comedy
  • The Thing About My Folks – a touching family/father and son movie
  • This Film Is Not Yet Rated – very interesting documentary about the MPAA rating system and its influence on the film industry
  • Tideland – bizarre Terry Gilliam movie, strangely fascinating
  • TiMER – a “romantic comedy” with a touch of science fiction technology – a decent way to spend some of your time, waiting for your timer to go off and find your soul mate.
  • Together – a Swedish movie about communal living in a house, set in the 70’s – interesting character studies, though not for everyone.
  • Transformers – I don’t quite understand the hype this movie got – perhaps I’m getting jaded by “the usual” computer graphics effects – without those there isn’t really much to this movie
  • Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives – a Thai movie – I would suggest you not waste your time – there may be some cultural meaning that is lost on me
  • Up – I have never seen such a depressing beginning to an animated feature. While there were a few interesting moments, I cannot comprehend the attention and awards this movie received
  • Valhalla Rising – a rather strange, supernatural story with a Viking feel to it – not what I would call a happy-ending, feel good movie, but it kind of pulled me in.
  • The Virgin Suicides – the tv guide had it listed as a comedy – it is not – strangely interesting, though definitely disturbing
  • Visioneers – a dark parody of modern life – made my usual attitude feel right at home – wasn’t til later that I connected “Sahra” with “Oprah.”
  • Waiting for Forever – a romantic comedy with Tom Sturridge playing a young man who has been waiting for a long time to develop a relationship with a young woman he was in love with as a child – worth watching.
  • Waking the Dead – all right, not a movie, but a British TV series – watched every episode and wish there were more
  • Wallace & Gromit – The Curse of the Were-Rabbit – I guess I’m not that much of a Wallace & Gromit fan
  • Wallace & Gromit – A Matter of Loaf and Death – this wasn’t too bad – short and had a few humorous moments
  • WALL-E – cute animated tale about love between two little robots with a very strong “green” slant
  • The Way – a father takes up his son’s hike of the Camino de Santiago pilgrimage route in the Pyrenees after his son dies at the beginning – Martin Sheen seems just a little too stiff in this
  • Whatever Works – typical Woody Allen fare (and that’s a positive statement) with Larry David standing in for Woody – a strangely happy movie
  • When Do We Eat? – not what I expected it to be – a dysfunctional Jewish family tries to have their Passover Seder meal – I enjoyed it, and not being Jewish, I learned some things, too.
  • White Christmas – an oldie but a goodie – Danny Kaye & Bing Crosby – who could ask for more?
  • Who Is Harry Nilsson (And Why Is Everybody Talkin’ About Him?) – a biography of Harry Nilsson, one of my favorite singers – well done and I enjoyed learning more about his life.
  • The Wraith – this is rated 3 1/2 stars out of 5 on Netflix, which just goes to show that people are nuts – stupid 80’s piece of junk with Charlie Sheen sucking as much as usual.
  • X-Men 3: The Last Stand – good X-Men comic book fare
  • Zootopia – animated fun for the whole family, with a slothful strongpoint.